The Diminutive Debut Edition

In which we bring you motoring news from around the Web:

• Two weeks after releasing engine specifications and promotional shots of the car dressed in light camouflage, Mini held a Web reveal of its Coupe on Monday. The car sits roughly two inches lower than the Mini Cooper hatchback, and oval recesses are carved in the roof liner to provide additional head room. Its fastback roofline integrates a spoiler, and the rear deck also contains a spoiler that automatically raises at highway speeds. Pricing will be announced closer to its official debut at the Frankfurt auto show in September. (BMW Group)

• Ford is expected to spend $1 billion by 2014 to strengthen the product line of its Lincoln division. The commitment came after months of agitation by Lincoln dealers for vehicles that would compete more closely with models from Cadillac and Buick, as well as from European and Japanese brands. Through May, Lincoln had sold fewer than 35,000 vehicles in the United States, a 7.5 percent decline from a year ago. (The Detroit News)

• At the Buenos Aires auto show, General Motors has shown a number of new production models and concepts, though the debuts are intended for the Central and South American markets. The Chevrolet Colorado Rally concept draws nominal inspiration from the Dakar Rally, which takes place in South America. A Cobalt concept, which would be sold alongside the Cruze hatchback in Argentina, also was shown, but neither car was expected to be sold in the United States. (Chevrolet)

• Bonhams, the auction house, announced Tuesday that it would conduct a single-marque auction at the BMW Museum in Munich this fall. Consigned vehicles include a 1976 BMW 3.0 CSL “Batmobile” Competition coupe, which logged victories at Le Mans and Spa. The presale estimate for the coupe ranges from £325,000 to £375,000, or $527,000 to $608,000. (Bonhams)

• Three medium-size central California cities — Fresno, Modesto and Bakersfield — experience the highest number of car thefts per capita in the nation, according to a report by the National Insurance Crime Bureau, a nonprofit funded by the insurance industry. In total, eight of the top 10 spots were occupied by metropolitan regions within California; Spokane and Yakima, Wash., rounded out the top 10. (The San Jose Mercury News)