Edmunds Says Kia Sales Rose 83 Percent in New York

Kia experienced exceptional growth in the New York metropolitan area in 2011, with sales increasing 83 percent in 2011, according to Edmunds.com. Its Web site compared new-car registration data provided by Polk, the automotive forecasting company, from January through November 2010 with the same 11-month period in 2011. Kia’s performance made it the fastest-growing automotive brand in the metropolitan area among the 35 brands included in the Edmunds analysis.

In raw numbers, there were 17,005 new Kia registrations during that period in New York, which Edmunds defined as the city and surrounding communities in New York, New Jersey and Connecticut. That compares with 9,304 in 2010. Nationally, Kia sales increased 54 percent.

The Korean automaker’s coup, however, was no indication of broader success for the industry in the city. Of the top 10 largest markets that Edmunds analyzed, New York experienced the slowest growth, at 4 percent, compared with 12 percent nationally. Three markets outpaced the national average, with Chicago improving by 16 percent over 2010, and Los Angeles and Dallas-Fort Worth tied at 14 percent. In a media release, Edmunds did not say why companies experienced such sluggish growth in New York relative to the rest of the country.

After Kia, three of the four brands that experienced the greatest growth in New York were Chrysler divisions. Jeep was second with an increase of 67 percent (55 percent nationally); Chrysler with 42 percent (48 percent nationally); and Dodge at 33 percent (28 percent nationally). GMC rounded out the top five, with 31 percent growth (19 percent nationally).

Lexus, Toyota’s luxury division, experienced the biggest decline of the surveyed brands, with sales falling 22 percent in the city and 12 percent nationwide.

While Lexus was hard hit, Mazda sales were also down, by 17 percent (1 percent nationally); Toyota sales decreased 13 percent (6 percent nationally); Honda was down 12 percent (3 percent nationally); and Acura, Honda’s luxury subsidiary, was down 10 percent in New York versus 4 percent nationally.

In a media release, Edmunds said the declines for the Japanese brands were attributable to supply challenges after the March earthquake and tsunami in northeast Japan.